Flower Roll and Cover Game

Jun 1, 2019

Activity for ages 5 to 7.

I love using roll and cover games with my students because they make it so fun to practice different math skills: addition, subtraction and even number recognition.

Scroll below to grab your free flower-themed game boards and then save even more planning time by hopping over to pick up ALL of our fun spring themed centers!

Differentiating

To make it easy for you to differentiate, there are four versions of the roll and cover games included in your free download (below):

–> Flower Roll and Cover (with numbers 1-6),

–> Flower Roll and Cover (with numbers 2-12),

–> Flower Plus One, and

–> Flower Minus One.

Because you can print a just right version for every child in class, the activity is great for independent, partner, small group work, or math stations.

Getting Ready

When it was time to prep the activity, I printed the boards on white cardstock to give them extra durability.

Then I grabbed dice and a container of counting chips and we were ready for some math fun!

Flower Roll and Cover (numbers 1-6)

For this version of the game, my students needed one playing dice and a container of chips to cover the flowers.

Students started by rolling the dice and counting the dots on top.

In the example below, the student rolled a 4. He searched the board, found a flower with the number 4 on it, and covered it with a counting chip.

Students continued taking turns rolling and covering the number until all of the flowers on the board were hidden.

Flower Roll and Cover (numbers 2-12)

For this version of the game, my students needed two dice and a container of chips to cover the flowers.


Students started by rolling the dice and adding the numbers together.

In the example below, the student rolled a 1 and 6. She quickly realized that the sum was 7 and announced, “One plus six equals seven.”

She searched the board, found a flower with the number 7 on it, and covered it with a chip.

Students continued taking turns rolling and covering the number until all of the flowers on the board were covered.

Flower Plus One

Next up was Flower Plus One.

For this version of the game, my students needed one dice and a container of chips to cover the flowers.

Since this board practiced adding one to the number rolled, students started by rolling the dice.

In the example below, the student rolled a 5 and said, “Five plus one more equals six.”

Then he used a chip to cover the number 6 on his board.

Students continued taking turns rolling and covering the number until all of the flowers on the board were covered.

Flower Minus One

Finally, we had Flower Minus One.

For this version of the game, my students needed one dice and a container of chips to cover the flowers.

Just as the name suggests, students started by rolling the dice and taking away just one.

In the example below, the student rolled a 3. She said, “Three minus one equals 2” and then covered up a 2 on her board.

Children continued taking turns rolling and covering the number until all of the flowers on the board were hidden.

Grab Your Download

Ready for some Flower Roll and Cover Game fun?! Just click the blue button below to grab your FREE download!

Then make sure to hop over and snag all of our fun spring themed centers for even more math fun!

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2 Comments

  1. Jennie

    Hi,

    Can I ask why you’ve used the term “dot cubes” instead of dice in your resource? I think the activity looks great but the language has put me off downloading it.

    Thanks for any information!

    Reply
    • Ashley

      Hi Jennie,
      Thanks for reaching out.
      This activity was submitted by one of our contributing writers. She is a Pre-K teacher, so it was just personal preference.
      You’ll notice we refer to them as “dice” in the post, so they are the same thing.
      Hope that helps!
      Warmly,
      Ashley // Happiness Ambassador

      Reply

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Hi, I’m Malia.

I love giving Pre-K, Kindergarten and First Grade teachers easy-to-follow systems for getting EVERY student bigger results.

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