Posts Tagged "Reading on Own"

Magic E Bingo

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Magic E Bingo

Nothing says “competition” like a good old-fashioned game of Bingo.  There’s something about the back and forth of covering more squares than a neighbor that gets competitive spirits racing.  Teachers have picked up on this not-so-surprising effect and use Bingo to teach all sorts of things: numbers, letters and, in this case, words.   This version of Bingo is perfect for children who are able to sound out three-letter words on their own and are ready to take a leap and learn about the powerful “Magic [E]“.  You see, when the letter [e] is written at the...

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Non-Fiction Motivation: Anticipation Guides

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Non-Fiction Motivation: Anticipation Guides

Anticipating is half the fun.  Take traveling as an example.  Every year, my family and I enjoy a getaway with our closest family friends.  We look forward to the trip all year long and half the fun is planning what we are going to do together.  We brainstorm possible destinations, think about the pros and cons of each, research hotel options, and map out our daily itineraries.  Organizing every detail gives us the chance to enjoy our trip for months before we actually step out the door.   “What does this have to do with reading?”, you ask.  Well, readers anticipate...

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The Magic {E}

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The Magic {E}

I confess.  I love wands.  Maybe I was a magical princess in another life.  Anyway, every year when it came time to teach my students about long vowels, I was always excited to bring out my Magic E Wand.  You see, when the letter E is written at the end of a word, it usually changes the sound that the middle vowel makes.  Just like a magician changes a rabbit into a frog or makes a person disappear, the letter E magically changes words.  For example, the word “kit” changes to “kite” and “plan” transforms to “plane”.   Helping children...

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Increase Reading Comprehension with a KWL Chart

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Increase Reading Comprehension with a KWL Chart

Are you looking for a helpful way to improve your child’s reading comprehension?  KWL charts are a great solution.  Before you begin reading together, write down everything your child already KNOWS about the topic.  (That’s the K in “KWL”.)  Then brainstorm a list of questions you WANT to know.  (That’s the W.)   And finally, after you have read together, make a list of information you LEARNED.  (The L.)   Watch the video (right) to see a quick demonstration and print the KWL chart to use with the activity.

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Reading Comprehension Questions

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Reading Comprehension Questions

In addition to knowing how to sound out words, good readers must also be able to think about what is happening in the story.  After all, there is little point in taking the time to read if your child cannot remember anything that happened.  Teachers call this skill “reading comprehension”.  One of the best ways to help your child develop comprehension skills is by asking questions during and after you read together.  Print the list of questions (right) and keep it by your favorite reading spot to help start conversations.   Pin...

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