Posts Tagged "Bringing Books Alive"

Engaging Reading : Act It Out

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Engaging Reading : Act It Out

Guest post by Suz at Lovely Little Bookworms.   The next blogger in our guest series is Suz, the writer behind Lovely Little Bookworms. This former elementary school teacher is passionate about reading and it shows.  Her posts share simple ways that you can help your children become lifelong readers. I love them all!  Her guest post shares an easy way to help little ones connect with stories: encourage them to act it out. Enjoy.   I have been thinking a lot lately about what really makes kids love reading from an early age and to me it is all about them seeing books as fun and...

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How to Start Your Own Book Share

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How to Start Your Own Book Share

Written by Susan Wilson – a National Board Certified elementary school teacher and stay at home mom. Our neighborhood is bursting with children.  Seven 3 year olds live next door to one another. Bizarre, but true.   One day, as my two sons (ages 3 and 1) and I were walking our tower of books back to the local library, I realized that we probably had a library full of books right next door. So, on our way home, I stopped and asked my neighbors if they’d be interested in a book share. I would pick two themes (insects, fairies, firetrucks, etc.) and everyone would contribute...

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17 Book Boredom Busters

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17 Book Boredom Busters

  I love to bring books alive for kids by creating entertaining pretend play, craft and art activities that help them connect to stories.  This round up of 17 favorites is guaranteed to bust through even the worst case of book boredom.         Our list of book boredom busters starts with an activity for the classic book, The Carrot Seed. After reading the story with your children,  help them act it out like this puppet show from The Golden Gleam.     * * * * * *   Read Amy Rosenthal’s irresistible story Little Pea and then invite your...

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DIY Easy Readers

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DIY Easy Readers

If you’ve spent much time looking through the early reader section at the library or book store, you probably noticed that the selection is pretty slim and most of the books are…. well…. boring.  It’s no wonder that many beginning readers aren’t very interested in practicing their new skill!   To help motivate your child to read, try this trick.  Buy an inexpensive photo album like the one photographed here – it cost $2 at Target.  Pick a title for your story.  If your child  loves talking about her accomplishments, your book could be named...

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Non-Fiction Motivation: Anticipation Guides

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Non-Fiction Motivation: Anticipation Guides

Anticipating is half the fun.  Take traveling as an example.  Every year, my family and I enjoy a getaway with our closest family friends.  We look forward to the trip all year long and half the fun is planning what we are going to do together.  We brainstorm possible destinations, think about the pros and cons of each, research hotel options, and map out our daily itineraries.  Organizing every detail gives us the chance to enjoy our trip for months before we actually step out the door.   “What does this have to do with reading?”, you ask.  Well, readers anticipate...

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Gardening Books for Kids

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Gardening Books for Kids

One of my New Year’s resolutions this year was to turn my very brown gardening thumb into a green one.  So when my mom came into town several weeks ago, the first item on our mother-daughter to do list was planting in our raised beds.  (True story.)  My oldest son, C, was very excited to dig in and lend a helping hand.  And it won’t surprise you that his enthusiasm inspired me to research gardening picture books that would help him learn more about growing plants.  Here are my favorite finds:   And Then It’s Spring by Julie Fogliano – A boy and his dog wait and wait for...

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Featured Teacher: Connecting to Books

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Featured Teacher: Connecting to Books

By Susan Wilson, Fourth Grade Teacher   This week’s featured teacher is Susan Wilson.  She is a National Board Certified fourth grade teacher and is currently staying at home with her two irresistible sons– one is three-years-old and the second is eight months.  Susan is one of those natural educators who makes inspiring a class of ten-year-olds look easy.  In this post, she shares how she creates an enthusiasm for reading with her oldest son:   “Three-year-old” and “active” are synonyms in my house.  Our oldest son always seems to be moving...

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Boost Your Child’s Creativity in 5 Minutes Flat

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Boost Your Child’s Creativity in 5 Minutes Flat

A couple of years ago, I started teaching at a new school that prided itself in helping children become lifelong thinkers.  Teachers developed this skill in a long list of different ways but one of my favorites was giving the time to let children invent things.  Several times each week, we pulled out big tubs of clean recyclables – everything from empty egg cartons to scraps of wrapping paper.  Students used tape and scissors to combine the recycling and create new inventions.  By watching them work, I learned that paper towel rolls make great jet packs and boxes can easily be...

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Book Treasures

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Book Treasures

  Calling all Martha Stewart types!  Help your child improve her reading comprehension and give yourself an excuse to get crafty at the same time.  After reading a book together, give her a small “treasure” that you made for her to keep as a reminder of something important in the story.  For example, we made a caterpillar treasure for the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar by gluing together several small pom poms to make a body, an inch long piece of pipe cleaner to use for the caterpillar’s antennae, and a pair of eyes we cut out of white construction paper.     In...

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A Letter to Obama’s Dog

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A Letter to Obama’s Dog

I am a huge fan of connecting reading and writing to real life experiences.  I read books about doctor visits before my boys visit their pediatrician to help them connect stories to their own life and I try to talk out loud as I add items to our grocery list so that my sons will notice that writing has a purpose.   I must admit, though, that I have always been a little stumped about how to make an authentic connection to President’s Day.  After all, most of the men that we are celebrating have already passed and even the concept of a president is hard for children to...

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